Posts Tagged ‘Africa’

Muhammad- the brilliant star of freedom: No slavery in Quran

March 22, 2014

http://thesuperstitiousnakedape.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/hermeneutics-2/comment-page-1/#comment-13372

PAARSURREY says:

March 22, 2014 at 4:59 pm
@BOBBIERILEYJR says:March 22, 2014 at 12:12 am

“Most telling is that slavery is still practiced in the Sudan, Niger, Mauritania and a few other corners of the Muslim world.” Unquote

It has got nothing to do with Quran/Islam/Muhammad. There is no commandment or teaching in Quran to make one a slave.
I think it will be clear to one if one listens the following Friday Sermon from Mirza Masroor Ahmad- the Head of the World-Wide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

He is the fifth rightful Successor to Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908) – The Promised Messiah – The Second Coming:
[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVBxj5rVA8k?feature=player_embedded&w=640&h=360%5D

The original Sermon was delivered in Urdu; its translations are available in following languages:

Urdu, English, Albanian, Arabic, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, French, German, Indonesian, Malayalam, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Tamil, Turkish

Please click the language of your choice by accessing the following link:

http://www.alislam.org/friday-sermon/2011-11-25.html

Blind faith of an educated American and an uneducated African

April 2, 2013

Paarsurrey says:

Hi JC

I quote from the post and give my comments:

1. “He (Pat Robertson) and people like him should be exposed at every turn as the harmful frauds that they are”
I agree with you

2. “Here’s a tip, folks: any time that someone uses the term “skepticism” with a negative connotation, your bullshit-o-meter should be setting off an alarm.”

Is it not a whimsical approach? Why should not the above meter set off alarm when skepticism is used with positive connotation?

3. “Overseas, they’re simple, humble. You tell ‘em God loves ‘em and they say, ‘Okay, he loves me.’ You say God will do miracles and they say, ‘Okay, we believe him.’ And that’s what God’s looking for.”

If that is the statement of Pat Robertson not of the people of Africa; then it is questionable.

But if that is what the innocent people of Africa say; then it cannot be termed as blind faith if that is based on their personal experience, simply because they are not apparently educated. And an educated man in the US on the other hand could have blind faith, if he has no personal experience in a matter or he has not done experiment, if the issue is physical and falls within the domain of science.

Note: I tried to put these comments directly on your website; but somehow it could not appear there; so I reblogged it. Thanks

The Word of J.C.

Pat Robertson speaks outWell, Pat Robertson is at it again, this week.  On Monday’s episode of The 700 Club, a viewer posed a question about miracles.   Rightwingwatch.org uploaded a video clip of the episode, and I still haven’t decided which was worse: the question, or Robertson’s response.

Caller: “Why do amazing miracles (people raised from the dead, blind eyes open, lame people walking) happen with great frequency in places like Africa, and not here in the USA?”

Now, my first instinct is to wonder if this guy is for real. I’m not completely convinced that this wasn’t a masterfully executed exercise in trolling, especially considering that Monday was April Fool’s Day.  For now, though, let’s ignore the ridiculousness of the suggestion that Africa, many parts of which are poverty stricken, riddled with conflict and facing an AIDS crisis, is a continent that has been blessed with an abundance of miracles, and take…

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Islam does not approve of slavery

March 20, 2013

Question and Answer with Hadhrat Mirza Tahir Ahmad, 18 November 1995

http://www.alislam.org/v/544.html

Please see the video Q4 @ 00:41:05, 00:48:05 I read in Times a few weeks ago, “A charity in Sudan is buying back slaves captured by the Arab Militias and converting them to Islam. Are there any other forms of slavery in Islam?
Its answer ends @ 01:02:00: Duration of the answer is only: 00:53:95

Full face veil in women might have originated in Africa- an opinion

March 20, 2013

I think full face veil in women originated in Africa and as humans spread from Africa to Europe and Asia it went with them there; please see the following:

1. Nandi People of Africa

“after Nandi girls have
been operated upon at puberty,
they must stay in their mothers’
huts in complete seclusion for a
month or more. After recovering
from the effects of the operation,
they may be married. But if no
husbands appear, the girls continue
to live in a secluded state for several
weeks longer. If they go abroad,
they must always wear long masks
and veils ; they must not stand near
anybody or call a person by name ;
they may not enter a cornfield or a
cattle-kraal; and they may do no
work. ^ Again, a Nandi bride, for
an entire month after her marriage,
is waited on by the bridegroom’s
mother, since it is unlawful for a
bride during this period to per-
form labour. Similarly, a Nandi
mother, after the birth of a child,
is unclean and may not do any
housework for a month.”

http://archive.org/stream/restdaysastudyi00websgoog/restdaysastudyi00websgoog_djvu.txt

2. MARRIAGE CEREMONIES AMONGST THE BAHIMA (East Africa).

“The young women are never consulted with regard to their
marriage. The young man never sees the girl’s face before
he applies to her father. Even then he cannot see it, though
she is usually present, closely veiled in a huge wrap of bark-
cloth. The Bahima women live in close retirement, and are
always veiled. In this respect they must not be confused with
the subject race, the Bairu (the singular form is Muiru). The
Bairu women go unveiled and work in the fields, but the
Bahima women never go unveiled and never work in the fields.
It is usual, when a Bahima woman is baptised on being con-
verted to Christianity, for her to uncover her face, but imme-
diately after the ceremony the covering is resumed, and on no
other occasion outside her private apartment does she leave
her face uncovered.”

Full text of “Uganda and its peoples; notes on the protectorate of Uganda, especially the anthropology and ethnology of its indigenous races”
http://archive.org/stream/ugandaitspeoples00cunniala/ugandaitspeoples00cunniala_djvu.txt

Barak Obama -“The essential truth of democracy is that each nation determines its own ‎destiny.”‎

July 29, 2009


http://www.faithfreedom.org/2009/07/29/u-s-should-encourage-democracy-in-africa-‎counter-the-wahhabis
/‎

Hi friends

I think President Obama’s following words are quotable quotes or words of wisdom.

‎ “The essential truth of democracy is that each nation determines its own destiny.”‎

‎“Each nation gives life to democracy in its own way, and in line with its own traditions.”‎

‎“In Moscow, I spoke of the need for an international system where the universal rights of ‎human beings are respected, and violations of those rights are opposed. And that must ‎include a commitment to support those who resolve conflicts peacefully, to sanction and ‎stop those who don’t, and to help those who have suffered.”‎

I appreciate Dr. Walid Phares to have given them in his article.‎

I don’t agree with Dr. Walid Phares’s advice that the West should intervene in the affairs ‎of other nations in the name of democracy or humanity; this would be like the “terrorists” ‎use the name Muslim while their acts and deeds are only political and are not supported ‎by Quran/Islam/Muhammad.‎

Is Dr. Walid Phares a “Taliban or Al-Quaida” of the Atheists/Agnostics; suggesting ‎aggression in the name of democracy or human rights? ‎

I don’t think so.‎

He should have supported Obama’s wisdom.‎

Thanks

I am an Ahmadi peaceful Muslim